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Dear life : stories
2013
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Where is it?
Summary
The fourteen stories in this brilliant collection show Alice Munro coming home to southwestern Ontario, with Toronto looming on the horizon. Even "To Reach Japan," where a Vancouver mother takes her young daughter across the country by train, ends in Toronto. On that journey, different kinds of passion produce surprises, both on the journey and at its end.

The range of storytellers is astonishing, as we hear the young voices of women recalling their teenage years and the equally convincing voice of an old woman fighting Alzheimer's. Margaret Atwood once shrewdly noted that "pushing the sexual boundaries is distinctly thrilling for many a Munro woman," and very few of these stories deal with men and women in sedate, conventional domestic settings.

Munro admirers will see that these stories are shorter than many in her recent col­lections, but they have all the sharpness, accessibility, and power of her earlier work, and they are--as always--full of "real" people. The final four works ("not quite stories") bring the author home, literally. She writes: "I believe they are the first and last--and the closest--things I have to say about my own life."

Trade Reviews
Booklist Review
*Starred Review* Munro's latest collection brings to mind the expression, What is old is new again. As curiously trite and hardly complimentary as that statement may sound, it is offered as unreserved praise for the continued wonderment provided by arguably the best short-story writer in English today. Some of these 14 stories present new directions in Munro's exploration of her well-recognized universe (rural and small-town Ontario), while other stories track more familiar paths, with characters and familial situations reminiscent of previous stories. That said, the truth is that on whatever level of reader familiarity Munro is working, in every story she finds new ways to make the lives of ordinary people compelling. Amundsen has a setting that will pique the interest of avid Munro followers, yet it is delivered with a tone surprising and even disturbing. A young woman ventures to a remote area to assume teaching duties in a TB sanitarium, soon entering into a dismal relationship with the head doctor. But with Munro's care in craftsmanship and her trademark limpid, resonant style, the reader accepts that the depressing aftereffect is Munro's intention. Haven will come to be considered one of her masterpieces: a quick-to-maturation piece, a fond specialty of Munro's, this one is about a teenage girl going to live with her aunt and uncle while her parents do missionary work. In quite dramatic fashion, she observes that what might appear as somone's acceptance of another person's quirks may actually be indifference. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: A first printing of 100,000 copies supports Munro's international popularity.--Hooper, Brad Copyright 2010 Booklist
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